Initial impact and peak hip extension 

Say NO to Running Injuries
I know you're tired of dealing with IT band pain, shin splints, patellar tendon inflammation, and all the other ways running injuries manifest themselves. I feel your pain and have been there as well. Most running injuries occur due to faulty mechanics that can thankfully be fixed. There's a few guidelines that good running form stems from: neutral pelvis, hip dominance, and landing over your center of mass. Any one of those can cause a breakdown over time. 

Trunk Lean
What if I told you we could shave off 2 mins from your fastest 5K? I've seen form improvements bleed over into those types of PR's in just a few weeks. How's your trunk lean? If it's not between 8º and 12º you could be putting on the brakes and decreasing your running economy. How about your front foot, when it impacts the ground? Is it in front or directly under your center of mass? Hard to tell.. I know.

During my running form assessment, I shoot video and use software to analyze your movement pattern. The eye misses things the camera will see, and we all know it's hard to make corrections on our own. By looking at individual frames we can focus on when your foot hits the ground and what this means to your form. 

The hip is where your power comes from but how much extension are you getting out of the back? We can measure this and find limiting factors, address those issues, and have you kicking far harder then ever. 

Glutes VS Quads
Many runners tend to be knee dominant and over use their quads and hamstrings. This leaves our secondary movers doing the work of a primary mover. Not ideal. We need to make the switch in the brain and allow the glutes to power the machine. Quads and hams should be there to help, not dominate.

Your daily movement patterns and posture determine your running and lifting abilities. See what's going on and have a professional eye give a glance to your patterns. Re-educating the brain and defining new ways to conceptualize your form will greatly enhance your run pattern. A much faster path to gaining speed compared to training bad form and only working on fitness.

Happy Training,
Joe